If you’re a DJ and want to know how to prepare for clients, you need to know what they are likely to ask you about.  While I’ve had some very strange requests and other that are due to customer ignorance (or lack of communication on my part), there a few that are common to nearly every client.  It doesn’t matter if you’re a wedding DJ or spinning turntables in a late-night club, you’ll need to have a confident response to these four below…

What’s Your Price?

There are a lot of people that are just concerned with price. They are likely to try and haggle with you and they are going to want to know why you’re charging what you do. Make sure you have a price in mind and that you don’t just tell someone that it’s up to them or depends on a certain thing. Sometimes if you let people decide for you by throwing out the first price, you are going to end up losing them as a client. It helps to have a firm price that is close to what other people are charging for the same thing.

What kind of music do you play?

Some people are not going to want to bring their own music for you so you’ll have to build a playlist for their event. You need to ask them about what they like and what they don’t find to be acceptable. For instance, a DJ may not want to play new hip hop music at a wedding for an elderly couple. Don’t just assume, however, that certain groups like certain things because you may be wrong and that can really put a damper on the event.

What is your setup like?

People may not have an event that they want you to play at that has a sound system. In that case, you’d have to bring everything including monitors or whatever you use to play music through. If there is a system, then you need to know how to hook up everything through it so you can use it. It may be wise to ask them where this event will be and if they can get you in to see the place before you head out there. That way, you’re able to tell them if you can do the job or not.

Do you have any examples of you doing an event?

This is a question that you may be asked so they can see if you have experience. If you have videos online of you doing work or if you know where some reviews are posted you may want to pass them on. This is why it’s good to work on putting up what you do online. You may also be ale to talk them into letting you do a test run so they can see if they want to work with you if they are unsure.

Again, if nothing else, you should be well prepared to answer these common inquiries as a professional DJ.  I would even go so far as to develop a canned response and practice answer them with a friend to be extra prepared.  Anyone that wants to use a service is probably going to want to know more before they pull the trigger.

Cheers and good luck!

…Alex

http://www.studiodelphin.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Questions-Clients-Ask-DJs-1024x682.jpghttp://www.studiodelphin.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Questions-Clients-Ask-DJs-150x150.jpgAlex FigueroaDJ AdviceDJ Businesscommon dj questions,questions clients ask djsIf you're a DJ and want to know how to prepare for clients, you need to know what they are likely to ask you about.  While I've had some very strange requests and other that are due to customer ignorance (or lack of communication on my part), there a...DJ Delphins Professional DJ Blog